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  • Paperback
  • 274
  • The Homeric Epics and the Gospel of Mark
  • Dennis Ronald MacDonald
  • English
  • 01 July 2018
  • 9780300172614

Dennis Ronald MacDonald Ü 2 Free download

The Homeric Epics and the Gospel of Mark Review é 102 Anti epic MacDonald says presenting Jesus as a suffering hero modeled after but far superior to traditional Greek heroes Much like Odysseus Mark’s Jesus sails the seas with uncomprehending companions encounters preternatural opponents and suffers many things before confronting rivals who have made his house a den of thieves In his death and burial Jesus emulates Hector although unlike Hector Jesus leaves his tomb empty Mark’s minor charac. MacDonald s thesis is that Mark deliberately used Homer as a model and planted flags within his text that make this clear His argument is sufficiently thorough and convincing that one can t merely dismiss it as just another theory My primary reservation is that I don t have enough experience in this area to decide at once if similar parallels with other works might be possible Certainly any charismatic leader whose popularity grows must find themself in similar situations with crowds and critics Perhaps for that same reason such events are part of the human experience conveyed in Homer s epics

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The Homeric Epics and the Gospel of Mark Review é 102 In this groundbreaking book Dennis R MacDonald offers an entirely new view of the New Testament gospel of Mark The author of the earliest gospel was not writing history nor was he merely recording tradition MacDonald argues Close reading and careful analysis show that Mark borrowed extensively from the Odyssey and the Iliad and that he wanted his readers to recognize the Homeric antecedents in Mark’s story of Jesus Mark was composing a prose. Half way through reading MacDonald s other work Does the New Testament Imitate Homer I converted from someone who used to believe these texts were backwards ramblings of ancient goat herders to understanding these writers whoever they were were probably of the upper educated class This alone caused me to give a second look with a different perspective to the New TestamentNow after finishing the present volume The Homeric Epics and the Gospel of Mark I m considering taking up the study of Koine Greek to one day read the New Testament in it s original language A new appreciation has been madeIf anything the work of Dennis MacDonald changed the way I see these stories Since Mark was the first Gospel and Matthew and Luke copied and corrected along the way and John as well although much Gnostic we can now with fair certainty see the story of Jesus as myth making from copies of Greek epics primarily the Iliad and Odyssey This does not mean there was no historical Jesus although the case for mythicism is settled for me at least through the works of Richard Carrier and Robert M Price What this means is that the story of Jesus as what s survived in the New Testament is a Christian retelling of the works of Homer And with that if there was a historical Jesus that man has been lost to historySeeing the crucifixion as an imitation of the death of Hector and retrieval of his body by Priam was probably the most eye opening Because whatever else Christianity teaches the triumph of Jesus over death is the foundation of that belief system And yet seeing it now as a clever writer imitating the most important death in the Iliad forever changes my approach to it Once seen can no longer be unseenAs a fan of mythology now seeing the New Testament for what it is has enhanced my appreciation for it It is a shame that for two thousand years these stories were told as history and such tragedies too long and much to mention here became the result I wonder now if the writer of Mark ever meant for this to happen When and where did the origin of his Gospel get lost Was it not understood as being a work imitating Homer right out of the gate Or perhaps a matter suppressed for political reasons The answer to this may be lost to history as wellFor me personally the tragedy was my early dismissal of these texts as stated above But now after seeing the way Mark was constructed as well as much of the rest of the New Testament it s been a pleasure being wrong I am reminded of the story Richard Dawkins tells about the respected elder statesman of the Zoology Department of Oxford who found out he was wrong about teaching the Golgi Apparatus didn t exist An American gave a lecture showing that it was indeed real And afterwards the statesman approached the American shook his hand and said My dear fellow I wish to thank you I have been wrong these fifteen years If I ever meet MacDonald I may behavior the sameMy only reservation regarding the present volume was that perhaps two or three instances where MacDonald claimed mimesis seemed like stretching to make the case However even if those pieces are found to be in error the majority of Mark does indeed mimic the Odyssey and Iliad and with that I m much interested in continuing to study the history of Christianity from a learned perspective than before

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The Homeric Epics and the Gospel of Mark Review é 102 Ters too recall Homeric predecessors Bartimaeus emulates Tiresias; Joseph of Arimathea Priam; and the women at the tomb Helen Hecuba and Andromache And entire episodes in Mark mirror Homeric episodes including stilling the sea walking on water feeding the multitudes the Triumphal Entry and Gethsemane The book concludes with a discussion of the profound significance of this new reading of Mark for understanding the gospels and early Christianit. I think there is a gradient of Homeric influence with each parallel he mentions in the book Some parallels are close to nonexistent and others clearly show Mark s dependence on Homer Anyone who is interested in the Gospels should read this book it s one that needed to be written Maha·bhárata Book Eight Karna book concludes with a discussion of the profound significance of this new reading of Mark for understanding the gospels and early Christianit. I think there is a gradient of Homeric influence with each parallel he mentions in the The Wadsworth Anthology of Childrens Literature book Some parallels are close to nonexistent and others clearly show Mark s dependence on Homer Anyone who is interested in the Gospels should read this Index of Spanish Folktales Classified According to Antti Aarnes Types of the Folktale; book it s one that needed to Whiskey Etc be written